What are the Dimensions of an AirBadminton Court?

Unlike an indoor badminton court, AirBadminton court lines usually need to be set up in order to start playing! Getting the dimensions correct is crucial to having a fun and fair game. The Badminton World Federation (BWF) designed the court dimensions specifically with the AirShuttle and outdoor conditions in mind, so it’s important to get it correct. Without further ado, let’s take a look as to what the dimensions are in detail.

The dimensions of a singles AirBadminton court are 16.4 ft x 52.5 ft (5 m x 16 m) and has an area of 861.1 ft2 (80 m2) including the dead zone, and an area of 645.8 ft2 (60 m2) when not including the dead zone. The diagonal length of the singles court is 55.1 ft (16.8 m). The dimensions of the entire dead zone in singles (including dead zones on both ends of the court) are 13.1 ft x 16.4 ft (4 m x 5 m) and has an area of 215.3 ft2 (20 m2).

The dimensions of a doubles/triples AirBadminton court are 19.7 ft x 52.5 ft (6 m x 16 m) and has an area of 1033.3 ft2 (96 m2) including the dead zone, and an area of 775 ft2 (72 m2) when not including the dead zone. The diagonal length of the full court is 56.1 ft (17.1 m). The dimensions of the entire dead zone in doubles/triples (including dead zones on both ends of the court) are 13.1 ft x 19.7 ft (4 m x 6 m) and has an area of 258.3 ft2 (24 m2).

Singles, doubles, and triples are all played on the same standard court. The difference is that singles is played without the side alleys that extend 1.6 ft (0.5 m) on either side of the court.

AirBadminton Dimensions Vertical

If you’re interested in more in-depth AirBadminton material, we have other posts you would definitely want to check out.

What are the Dimensions of an AirBadminton Net?

The dimensions of an AirBadminton net are 20 ft x 2.49 ft (6.1 m x 0.76 m), which is the same as a standard indoor badminton net. The net is attached to posts that sit at the doubles sidelines. The posts should be 4.9 ft (1.5 m) high if playing on sand and 5 ft (1.52 m) high if playing on grass or other hard surfaces. The reason for this is because people’s feet sink into the sand, making them effectively shorter than they normally would be, and thus the net should be positioned slightly lower.

What are the Differences in Size Between a Singles Court and a Doubles/Triples Court in AirBadminton?

The singles court has a total inbounds area of 645.8 ft2 (60 m2) and the doubles/triples court has a total inbounds area of 775 ft2 (72 m2). This makes the doubles/triples court 20% larger than the singles court. This is due to the extra side alleys on either side of the court that are added in, which are 1.6 ft (0.5 m) wide each. However, the area per player is actually less. Take a look at the table below to see much how much area, on average, each player has to cover.

AirBadminton Singles Court Area
Singles Area
AirBadminton Doubles Court Area
Doubles/Triples Area

Doing some quick math, doubles players have to cover 50% more area than triples players, singles players have to cover 150% more area than triples players, and 66% more area than doubles players. So playing singles may be quite a bit more challenging! But the faster pace and coordination required in doubles and especially in triples (since you have to alternate hits) are quite difficult as well.

Now let’s take a look at the service and receiver areas. The singles service area is 161.5 ft2 (15 m2) and the doubles/triples service area is 193.8 ft2 (18 m2). Once again, we see that the doubles/triples area is 20% larger than the singles area. For the most part, you probably won’t see much difference in the service pattern even with a larger area in doubles. The only difference may be that you would be able to serve at a larger angle if you stood at the very side of the court to serve, but most players don’t attempt such serves. As for the receiver’s area, AirBadminton does not restrict it to a smaller area, therefore it is the same as the normal play area. Therefore, our analysis above would apply to the receiver’s area as well.

AirBadminton Singles Service Area
Singles Server and Receiver Area
AirBadminton Doubles/Triples Server and Receiver Area
Doubles/Triples Server and Receiver Area

What are the Differences in Dimensions Between an AirBadminton Court and an Indoor Badminton Court?

While AirBadminton and indoor badminton courts look quite similar, they do have some distinct differences that make them very unique from each other. We’ve done a full analysis of the indoor badminton court dimensions where you’ll find out how to use the court to your advantage and even how the court used to look back in 1890 (I bet you haven’t seen it before!). Now, let’s take a look at the differences in both the singles and doubles courts.

In singles, the AirBadminton court has dimensions of 16.4 ft x 52.5 ft (5 m x 16 m) and has a total playable area of 645.8 ft(60 m2) after subtracting out the dead zone. Indoor badminton has dimensions of 17 ft x 44 ft (5.2 m x 13.4 m) and has a total playable area of 748 ft(69.5 m2). As we can see, the AirBadminton court is significantly longer (by 19.4%) yet thinner (by 3.8%) than an indoor badminton court. The extra width of the indoor badminton court and the lack of a dead zone makes it so the total area covered is actually larger than that of AirBadminton by 15.8%.

In doubles, the AirBadminton court has dimensions of 19.7 ft x 52.5 ft (6 m x 16 m) and has a total playable area of 775 ft(72 m2) after subtracting out the dead zone. Indoor badminton has dimensions of 20 ft x 44 ft (6.1 m x 13.4 m) and has a total playable area of 880 ft(81.8 m2). Once again, the AirBadminton court is significantly longer (by 19.4%) yet thinner (by 1.5%) than an indoor badminton court. The extra width of the indoor badminton court and the lack of a dead zone makes it so the total area covered is actually larger than that of AirBadminton by 13.5%.

Overall, we see that the AirBadminton court is longer than the indoor badminton court but has less area to cover. These design choices were likely made because of the environmental factors in AirBadminton. For one, since there tends to be wind outdoors, the AirShuttle had to be heavier to be more air resistant. However, with the extra weight, AirShuttles tend to not drop as steeply and thus is more difficult to hit drop shots or other sort of net play. Rather, it makes it easy to hit far and flat, thus the longer court. Moreover, playing outdoors limits movement more as the surfaces may be harder (such as on grass or cement) or softer (such as in sand), so the smaller area required to be covered makes sense in this regard as well.

If you would like to receive alerts when we publish new posts, subscribe to us by clicking the bell icon.

Leave a Reply